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Author Topic: Hoof questions  (Read 549 times)

Kalli

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Hoof questions
« on: March 02, 2014, 01:41:23 pm »

Do some horses just have deeper frogs?  Is it normal to be deeper in front feet than back?

Recommendations for keeping the frog healthy?  Growing it in after thrush is gone?


Thanks!
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PathfinderSGF

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Re: Hoof questions
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2014, 02:04:20 pm »

By deeper, do you mean a deeper central sulcus or do you mean deeper collateral grooves?
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JMR - Scout and Cisco

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Re: Hoof questions
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2014, 03:40:22 pm »

I was wondering the same thing.  I have one horse that has very low sole and frog.  He is a TW but he had poor feet when we got him.  Long toes from being shod that way.  I have his toes pushed back shorter now and his feet are getting more depth in them but very slowly.  He is still not up to weight, he was very, very underweight when we got him last July.  I think once he gains all his weight he needs, his body will then make a better hoof with more growth. 

So, depending on how he is being trimmed, if his toes are too long, he will not have deep frogs.   But yes, the front usually is deeper than the back feet are.  But the Arab cross mare we have that does not grow much foot and has low soles.  It is just the way she is.  The under nourished young horse we have and trying to put more weight on still will probably have deeper frogs once he is up to the weight he should be at.  The vet is going to check his teeth at the spring checkup and we are going to worm him again when my order comes to be sure he is not still wormy.   

Just depends on the horse that you are looking at and trying to decide.  They are all different.

Jeanne 
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Cowgirl Up

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Re: Hoof questions
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2014, 07:30:53 pm »

No two are the same, as I have noticed.
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Kalli

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Re: Hoof questions
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2014, 08:51:51 pm »

Thanks for the info.

I was referring to the central part.   I'm not sure if anyone has had luck with growing in the frog but my friend is concerned about the deepness of Snuffle's central sulcus(?) since he gets thrush now and then when it's wet and muddy.   His collateral grooves are deep but I've heard that's fine.   

Just looking for ideas.

-Kalli

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OldnOrnery

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Re: Hoof questions
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2014, 09:25:24 pm »

Footing goes a long way toward keeping the frog healthy once a good trim is in place. This assumes a sound horse. The horse needs a trim that allows it to land heel first. If that's in place (and it's not as common as we'd hope), then a footing that won't  keep the sole caked on mud or manure for long periods of time.

We don't have thrush or other crud this year because of a drought and maybe pea gravel. When it's rainy and muddy for weeks at a time, they got some crud in the past . It was easy to control in about a week. It took daily picking, washing (put the foot in a bucket of water after picking and brushi the sole with a stiff brush), drying (stand the horse in clean shavings for 5 minutes) and application of No Thrush to the central sulcus.
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stablemind

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Re: Hoof questions
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2014, 05:40:10 am »

The center crack (central sulcus) should not be deep.  A deep central sulcus is caused by bacterial or fungal infection, including, but not always thrush. The goal in frog health is to get the central sulcus to completely fill in so it doesn't harbor infection. Deep side cracks (collateral sulcus) aren't necessarily caused by infection, but they can make a good hiding place for crud and infection.

In the photo below, you see a frog with a healthy central sulcus. There's a dip, but not a split. But notice that the lateral sulcus (lower groove in the photo) does have some fungal or bacterial invasion. (I took this photo when I was documenting the progress of white line disease (Glorie). The hole in her toe had almost filled in.)

I've had good results using NoThrush (powder) on infected frogs, but I've seen lasting improvement since starting them on SmartHoof (Smartpak hoof supplement) about a year ago.

 
« Last Edit: March 03, 2014, 05:43:05 am by stablemind »
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Kalli

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Re: Hoof questions
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2014, 07:05:41 pm »

Wow!  Snuffle's central sulcus does not look at all like that in the front.  His are deep and somewhat narrow.  It's interesting that my friend recently mentioned Smartpak with regard to this.  I guess I'd better give them a call. 

Thanks for posting the picture.  Having only 1 horse, I am so used to looking at my own horse's feet and not any others.  Now I can tell there's definitely room for improvement.  I should have known that, since my friend has never steered me wrong.

-Kalli
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kckc

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Re: Hoof questions
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2014, 07:51:00 pm »

kalli - send a pict of your horses hoof - I'd like to see and compare with mine..
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stablemind

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Re: Hoof questions
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2014, 05:00:44 am »

Kalli, you know my gelding, Babe. He has very hard hooves, with thick walls and a lot of concavity to his sole. As his hooves grow, his toes don't grow forward, but he gets a tall hoof instead. It's hard to keep his frogs healthy because they don't get a lot of stimulation from being in constant contact with the ground.

This was Babe's right front in spring 2009. You can see that it's skinny and the center sulcus is deep. What you may not be able to tell is how deep the frog is compared to his sole. This is actually a photo showing considerable progress in growing any frog at all. Babe's "froglessness" was a big reason I went looking for a good barefoot trimmer to help us get our horses' hooves healthier.

Frequent trims and constant thrush treatments got us to this point, but not a lot further. Once I started him on SmartHoof, he finally started growing a decent frog. (started SH about a year ago)

I should add, the hoof in the first picture is Glorie's. She and Lacey both tend to have a flatter hoof. Their frogs make lots of ground contact, so they naturally grow nice fat frogs.

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