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Author Topic: Horses and Wooded Property  (Read 2492 times)

Bejammie

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Horses and Wooded Property
« on: January 21, 2014, 08:03:41 am »

Hi ya'll,


It's been a long time.  A lot has happened, our lives kind of fell apart, but anyway that's a whole nother thread... 

We are moving our horses onto our land in a kind of emergency situation, we have no choice.  We will be putting up fences and a run-in shed for Syd and Birch, we are selling Abel.  However, right now the land is forest and saplings.  We plan on clearing some of it, but my questions is how much do we HAVE to clear.  Not ideally clear- HAVE to clear.  We will clear as much as we can over time and improve the situation more and more, however for right now it's kind of a what can we get by with for 6 months (safely and unstressfully for the horses). 

Thanks,

Allison
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Allison


Proud mom to Sydney, saddlebred, Birch, TWH, and Abel, SSH.

Raylin

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2014, 08:06:33 am »

Allison,

My horses are in a wooded area that we are slowly but surely clearing over the years. not sure what you mean that you have to clear? My horses seem to do well in wooded areas.

Raylin
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Bejammie

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2014, 08:23:12 am »

Raylin---your words are music to my ears.  How wooded is your area....like complete forest?  This is a lot that was a pasture 50 yrs ago and has grown up since....
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Allison


Proud mom to Sydney, saddlebred, Birch, TWH, and Abel, SSH.

SHNOOL

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2014, 08:24:22 am »

Does this help?  We cut down saplings (to the ground, no root removal).  Removed the loose rock, and ran electrobraid, done.  The horses will get used to it.  My best advice is to make sure you can get your hay supply and feed as close to the horses as possible.  Because you'll be throwing hay at them for a while.


I'll post a more current picture... lemme see:


« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 08:31:19 am by SHNOOL »
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Bejammie

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2014, 08:32:14 am »

yes, that helps a lot.  We are going to build a covered round-bale holder to keep a round bale out there 24/7, and we are going to picket them on grass when possible in the spring/summer.  Luckily they are both easy keepers and don't need much to stay a healthy weight, and both could lose a few pounds right now anyway. I hope our area looks as good as yours...I guess I'm concerned about them being able to run and kick up and play...this isn't the way I wanted to bring them home, but I am kind of excited about it, lol....

if you have any more pics, the more yall have of your wooded lots the better...i'm getting ideas and making plans and the best way to do that is to see what has worked for ya'll.

Of course we will take down all the maples and poisonous plants, we have a creek for water so we wont need to worry about that, and running water is just up the hill at chase's mothers house so we can walk them up there for baths, etc.  Sorry..now i'm just rambling. lol
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Allison


Proud mom to Sydney, saddlebred, Birch, TWH, and Abel, SSH.

SHNOOL

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2014, 08:56:14 am »

Um we have maples, and oaks in that pasture.

The big problem we had is they were eating the darned acorns!  So were the dogs!  We removed as many as we could from their paddock.

As for running and playing...  Yep, they've had no problems there.  It's amazing how easily they manage to navigate the rocks when they know you aren't riding them asking them too!
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Bejammie

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2014, 11:35:17 am »

How do we keep them from eating the acorns?  If we provide hay at their leisure, do you think they will still eat them?
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Allison


Proud mom to Sydney, saddlebred, Birch, TWH, and Abel, SSH.

Karen

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2014, 11:44:05 am »

Yeah, ours only ate the acorns when they were bored.  With enough hay, they left them alone.
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Karen

Bejammie

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2014, 11:57:46 am »

Any other pitfalls or hazards or important hints or tips yall can give me?  I feel like I'm flying blind into this rapid transition.  Kind of had the rug pulled out from under us with the boarding situation. 

I like to have everything planned out and as I want it, and this is kind of getting thrown together so PLEASE let me know if you can think of anything that would help me prepare for this transition.  I never thought Id have horses in the woods, I always thought they would be in a pasture, but things happen I guess.

We are lucky just to have the land to put them on, thank god Chases mom said she'd love to look out at them every morning, lol.
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Allison


Proud mom to Sydney, saddlebred, Birch, TWH, and Abel, SSH.

Karen

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2014, 12:35:48 pm »

The only other issue we've run into are rocks...we have SO many rocks that Trav sored his feet really bad stomping flies in mid-August this year.  Once we got shoes on him, he was better, and we're working on getting rid of as many rocks as we can.  We also expect their feet to toughen up to the terrain eventually (wishful thinking maybe??). 

Anyway, Trav will have rear shoes from mid-June/early-July until after fly season, and we might use a feed-through fly preventative this year too.

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Karen

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2014, 03:50:12 pm »

I used to have my horses in woods that were even thicker than what Ray has.  I'll look for a picture.  The trees actually blocked some of the wind in the winter and provided shade in the summer.  (But the mosquitos hung out pretty bad in there.)

The biggest thing we had to watch out for was trees or big branches getting blown down in storms.  It seems like something was always falling on the fence and we'd have to chain saw it.  And the horses would get pretty freaky when it stormed.  But I had another small paddock I could put them in when that happened.

Our other problem was that squirrels would fall into the metal water tank and drown.  Yuck.  I finally learned to put a 2x4 in the tank so they could crawl out it. 
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Liz from Texas

kckc

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2014, 04:22:24 pm »

Benjammie
I was wondering where you were!  Sorry your world has not turned kindly. 

My entire 40 acres is wooded.   I have slowly cleared some areas that I intend to make pasture.  My horses eat some acorns but I scrape some of the acorns out of the fence when the acorns first start falling so they don't overindulge.  I think the deer eat most.  I still have maples and black walnut trees on my property - I just watch the horses and they aren't interested in them.  Some of the trees are only dangerous if/when leaves fall of and die and the horses eat them.   My horses haven't shown any interest in those leaves.  If your horses are out all summer they will probably not be interested either but just watch them.   If you turning your horses out straight from a stall environment in the fall I would suggest more caution.    and just make sure they always have hay so that they aren't tempted to snack on other things.

First thing I'll tell you that if you tear down trees you are going to have a much bigger mess to take care of than you can imagine.  I cleared a small 20x20 area of saplings and had a mound of trees and roots that was as big as a semi.   so if you start clearing be ready.

Not sure what you plan but for pasture you should really look into the mulching clearing.  I just had that done and I'm fairly happy with it.  It's not cheap but it didn't leave me a pile of stumps and limbs or a pile needing to be burned.  It also should stop you from having holes left from stumps and sort of grinds the saplings so that you don't have sharp areas coming up from the ground.   It leaves a lot of mulch on the ground that will help you when/if you plant grass and stops weeds in the meantime.   Mulching the trees also means you don't have mud or messed up top soil.  I'm quite convinced it's the way to clear if you don't have adult trees to sell.

If you are going to get round bales plan ahead and just put up a shed roof that is big enough for all the horses to get under along with a bale ring - get a hay net and you'll be good to go.   That way if it is pouring down with rain or sleet your horses are out of the weather as well as the hay all under one roof.  If you can set up the shelter to where  you can store your hay away from them but under the same roof it will save you some time.

My horses make their own trails and it has really helped their feet when they are walking over roots and rocks.  I wouldn't worry about either.  You might be happier if you go with a natural horse trimming though so that you don't have foot sore horses when they lose shoes (if you're as lucky as mine have been).  My horses seem to be happy to be horses out roaming etc.

I won't tie up the whole thread but what are you fencing with?  I have an electric fence twirler-holder that allows you to roll out electric wire - you are welcome to borrow it.   I just put up fence a few years ago and I have a lot of research that might help you if I can find it. 

Let me know if I can help.  Oh & meant to ask - are you only keeping them on this property for 6 months?   Might be cheaper to board elsewhere than put up fence... or did I misunderstand?
Karen
« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 04:38:14 pm by kckc »
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Bejammie

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2014, 08:06:44 am »

We already are shoeless natural hoof people, so that's not a problem.  And the terrain they are currently on is just about identical to the terrain here, so that's good.  They are use to walking on gravel, so walking in the woods is a breeze, lol.  It only took a year (sarcasm), but finally Birch's hooves are tough enough for gravel. 

We are still deciding on what type of fencing to go with.  We will use barbed wire for the top wire only, and we are figuring out if we are going solar-electric fencing or what.  KC I will let you know if we need to borrow your fencing stringer thing...technical name, lol. ;) 

I am going down there today and will take photos of the property to upload on here.  Thanks so much for ya'lls help...I was almost panicked yesterday.  Talking and having advice really does help a lot!! Especially since this is the first time my horses will ever be on my property! ever! lol

Chase has planned out our barn...omg I can't believe im going to get to have a barn! lol....it's more of a run in shed area with a room for hay and grooming supplies and everything you need at a barn (except tack, it will stay at our house).  It has two 12x12 stalls, a spot in the middle where they can reach the round bale, and troughs for feed, and they have the creek so we don't have to worry about water, although I already have two water troughs so I'll probably use them too.  OMG I'm going to have my own stalls and stuff!! I'm so excited!

We have gone through the cost of building supplies and are thinking it will cost about 1500 to put up fencing and the barn.  We are building it ourselves so no labor costs, we already have some fencing stuff and other materials and supplies....bbl with photos....
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Allison


Proud mom to Sydney, saddlebred, Birch, TWH, and Abel, SSH.

kckc

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2014, 08:22:02 am »

gosh, don't use barbed wire.  It really doesn't do anything but catch their manes and tails.  It doesnt' stop horses from leaning over the fence and tangles so much easier than electric wire or anything.   there are just so many more options - please reconsider the barbed wire - it can also cause so many injuries if it comes loose or a deer gets caught in it.   oh & I think the term is spinner... took me 2 days to remember it.  sigh...age...
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Walkin45

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Re: Horses and Wooded Property
« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2014, 08:22:41 am »

Nows not a good time to start. 
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