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Author Topic: There's a fungus among us!  (Read 250 times)

Liberty1

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There's a fungus among us!
« on: January 12, 2019, 05:50:20 am »

Two of our horses now have black spots that have created a crater in the hoof wall.  We've not had this before.  Our Blacksmith recommended Save A Hoof application at least 3 times weekly which has helped the first situation, but same horse had a new spot develop on his other hoof.  Last visit the blacksmith suggested liming the pasture as the fungus could be in the soil.    It was a very wet summer and long wet fall.  The colt who has 2 spots has never been shod, and my mare had shoes pulled in October. 

Any suggestions or experiences with a situation like this? 
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stablemind

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2019, 06:17:47 am »

First, as much as you don't like to lose hoof wall, you need to have it resectioned to get rid of as much infected tissue as possible and the damp hole it's growing in. You can buy a product called White Lightning that you soak the foot in. The hoof has to be sealed up while it's soaking as the fumes are a big part of the treatment. (It's a food grade disinfectant.)

Otherwise, when you bring your horses in, clean out any cavities and get some kind of medication in there. There are lots of choices. I've had good results with a powder called No Thrush. I once creatively treated a deep, narrow hole in Babe's white line by keeping it cleaned out, shaking in some No Thrush and packing the hole with cotton. Every couple days I would pull the cotton out and repeat the treatment. The hole became more shallow each day and filled in enough that our trimmer removed the rest of it at the next trim.

If this link works, you can see how we successfully treated a bad case of white line disease. The hole cut in the hoof wall is what I mean by resectioning.  You should be able to follow the progression from serious infection to a healthy hoof.

http://smg.photobucket.com/user/Cydney/library/Hooves/Glorie%20WLD?sort=6&page=1

Edited to add: When I treated Babe's hoof by packing it with cotton, the last thing I did each time was cover the top layer with a pine tar clay called Sole Pack. That made the it virtually waterproof.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 07:33:23 am by stablemind »
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KysaSD

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2019, 06:49:15 am »

 Cyd has very good advice, as she has lived through this.  I have only seen this in other people‚Äôs horses.  But when white line disease gets to the point it makes a hole out the side of the hoof, it is very serious indeed and needs very serious treatment.  The hoof wall resectioning is important to get to the problem, as you simply cannot treat it well enough from the bottom of the hoof.  It needs to be open to air, and to the antifungal.  Fungi LOVE to be in enclosed damp places.  They do not like air, drying out or stuff like white lightning.

And white lightning is scary stuff, but about the best there is for serious hoof fungus.
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Kysa, South Dakota, 2 Mountain Horses, a Curly Foxtrotter, a TWH and a Mini, yes, I am crazy!

Walkin45

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2019, 06:51:46 am »

Prolly seedy toe. Can mix dmso and powdered tide. I usually treat my horses with turpentine now and then but my farrier was here the other day and he said to use kopertox. The gelding has it.
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stablemind

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2019, 07:42:40 am »

I also want to add, when a horse has white line disease, there are 2 things going on: Infection is growing upward within the hoof wall and the hoof wall is growing downward. You have to treat this aggressively so at the very least, the hoof is growing down faster than the infection is growing upward. Otherwise the cavity of infection remains, trim after trim.

Resectioning eliminates the perfect environment for the fungus to grow. Sometimes you can't open the hoof wall to the very top of the infection. You have to be really diligent to treat that fungus ridden cavity. Even the most effective products have to be used over a period of time.

I really have been there, done that. Our NW PA climate and acidic soil is the perfect environment for fungi. Yes, it's in your pastures, always has been and always will be.

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KysaSD

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2019, 07:50:29 am »

Ah yes the soil factor.  Acidic soils are much more conducive to these fungi.  I live in an area of neutral to slightly basic soils.  But this last year was so so wet, that we still had one horse manage to get thrush. 

I know PA has been warm enough to still be muddy and that is your biggest enemy, even now.  You need to good solid freeze so no new organisms are picked up while you try to treat the existing infection.  I doubt that will happen.
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Kysa, South Dakota, 2 Mountain Horses, a Curly Foxtrotter, a TWH and a Mini, yes, I am crazy!

Liberty1

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2019, 02:58:36 pm »

Thanks Kysa and Cyd - the hoofs were  trimmed and resected last week - the oldest spot we've been treating has responded and is filling in.  Based on what your experiences are I will look for white lightening or something more aggressive than what we've been using.  I've been keeping them all in their dry stalls at night so they have at least 12 hours a day on dry floor.  And I think I will ask our blacksmith to come resect in 2-3 weeks instead of waiting the usual 8 weeks in winter.  So glad we finally have snow on the ground.

It would've been too easy for lime to cure the soil...
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Winona

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2019, 06:04:42 pm »

White lightening works great! Good luck.
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Jodi, Northern NY, Paso Fino/Icelandic/Mini

Liberty1

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2019, 04:38:56 am »

Fred is scheduled for trims Thursday - looking forward to seeing how much healthy growth appears.  Shadows 3 feet look good now, but he has separation in his side walls on the left front.  The white lightening has turned his fetlock hair reddish.  I think Libertys hole should mostly disappear with this trim. 
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stablemind

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2019, 03:16:09 pm »

Be sure to let us know the outcome of Thursday's trims. This is a good time of year to get totally rid of this kind of thing, with hopes it doesn't recur. Spring in NWPA can be very challenging for keeping horses' hooves healthy.
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Liberty1

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2019, 01:41:42 pm »

Here are some before and after pics of Shadowfax from his trim today - progress but still a way to go. 
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Liberty1

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Re: There's a fungus among us!
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2019, 01:47:34 pm »

And Liberty's before and after trim results.  See the small red line where the crater was?  What's that?  And I don't love the little cracks all over her sole.
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