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Author Topic: Upping the roughage  (Read 238 times)

bewerking

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Upping the roughage
« on: October 11, 2018, 10:38:23 pm »

Yesterday the vet found a high residue of sand in my horse's manure. We are starting psyllium supplementation immediately but would like to hear what other sources of roughage you have found effective for prevention.  I was told to give him a cup of wheat bran per day but haven't found a source for this. He currently gets 14 pounds of hay a day and we will be upping it to 16, but what else?
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loneelk

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Re: Upping the roughage
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2018, 04:28:59 am »

I've heard of people feeding chia seeds to their horses, but not sure how much/where they get it.  We use a commercial pelleted psyllium product for our horses, BUT about 3 months ago, Gunner decided that he was NOT gonna be eating that stuff any more, so I'm looking for other options at this point.  I'll be following this thread w/ interest.
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stablemind

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Re: Upping the roughage
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2018, 04:46:24 am »

I've read that ground flax works very well to clear sand and prevent sand colic. It's high in omega 3 fatty acids. It's also good for hooves and makes a shiny coat.
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bewerking

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Re: Upping the roughage
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2018, 01:34:21 pm »

I had routinely been supplementing with ground flax to do just that. Not sure if I can discount the flax--I intend to continue using that-but we still have a real issue with sand accumulation. Thank you for your reply because it helps to know that others have found effective.
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oncidium

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Re: Upping the roughage
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2018, 06:02:32 am »

Beet pulp.  Lots of roughage there.

O
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abbypeaches

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Re: Upping the roughage
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2018, 03:31:51 pm »

Yes- beet pulp! Rehydrate it so they also get more water into their system!

Marilyn
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 Bud, 31yo reg. MFT gelding & Midnight Rendezvous (Kate) 2 yo MFT  mare.

bewerking

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Re: Upping the roughage
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2018, 11:27:45 pm »

Yes, I've heard three votes so far for beet pulp!Two from this forum and one from a knowledgeable horsewoman. Thank you all!
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oncidium

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Re: Upping the roughage
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2018, 07:17:14 pm »

Wheat bran leaches calcium from from horses. 

Long gone are the warm bran mashes. We thought they were beneficial and the horses loved them.
I

this was in the late 80’s early 90’s. it was found out it leached the calcium.

Beet pulp shredded can be fed wet or dry. Pelleted beet  pulp should be soaked only because it is hard for a horse to chew.  Pelleted can get an odd texture and not all horses will eat it. Best rougage is shredded.

Beet pulp is considered a hay, not a grain. It can be fed up to 30% of a horses daily forage. It may be more, I forget that stats on it. But could find out. It may be as much as 60%. It used to be posted on endurance dot net. But the site has changed and may be hard to find again.

O

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pasolucy

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Re: Upping the roughage
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2018, 01:16:08 pm »

I have questions.  Is it because they are eating hay off of the ground or is it even eating grass that causes sand colic.  It does not seem to be a problem where I live and do not know why a horse would get sand colic if the hay was not being fed on the ground and if that is the cause the cure would seem pretty simple. 
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PAWalker

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Re: Upping the roughage
« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2018, 04:26:22 am »

I have questions.  Is it because they are eating hay off of the ground or is it even eating grass that causes sand colic.  It does not seem to be a problem where I live and do not know why a horse would get sand colic if the hay was not being fed on the ground and if that is the cause the cure would seem pretty simple.

1.  Sand colic can happen from the horse inhaling particles of dirt/sand as it eats hay from the ground.    When I lived in SoCal's Low Desert, which is nothing but sand, my horses were not only on a daily feed thru of psyllium, I soaked the ground with water in a wide area under and around their hay feeders.

2.  While this article discusses the over-ingestion of Ash, it can also include sand/dirt while hay is being cut.

The new disk type cutters can leave hay fields cut down to literal dirt, for the sake of increased production.   Something the old style sickle bars could not do.

https://hayandforage.com/article-1977-down-and-dirty-with-cutting-height.html

In this day and age, if one does not know the person they buy hay from, it might be prudent to ask (1) what method they use to cut their hay, and (2) if it's the newer disk method, how low do they cut to the ground:)

Asking those questions doesn't mean the buyer has other options to buy hay but it will at least give the buyer a heads up as to what they might need to do with the hay such as soaking or steaming --- also a PITA if more than a 1-2 horses are involved :-\
« Last Edit: October 28, 2018, 04:27:58 am by PAWalker »
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bewerking

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Re: Upping the roughage
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2018, 10:44:14 pm »

Yes, my friends. until recently, my horse had been eating his forage on the ground. AND living just a mile from Lake Michigan, there is tons of sand here. Naively, I thought the supplemental flax was "deal with" any sand, but I certainly was wrong to make that assumption.  We are still clearing out the sand and are now upping the psyllium to 5 days on and 2 days off. After a month, he is still passing sand from his system.  I blame myself for not being more pro-active, but no one I know in this area seems to think of the sand ingestion as an issue until I moved to this new barn, All feeding is now in a stall with rubber mats!

I am just pondering another related thought: how moving from one geographic area to another poses a whole new set of issues. There are different types of forage as well as different soils, weather conditions and pests. If I ever move to a different region, I am going to make an appointment with the local vet to run through the best practices!
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