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Author Topic: The story of Rose  (Read 2263 times)

Mamafourboys

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #15 on: August 28, 2016, 07:02:06 pm »

Kysa, myself, and my 17 and 11 year old sons moved Rose and her round pen panels across the road at Kysa's place yesterday! It worked out well and she now has green grass and a little more space with a bale to eat.
She is still difficult to catch, but once caught is a very nice mare. She is not hard to handle. She loves to be rubbed and scratched. I'm handling her front feet as much as possible.
She seems to be more at ease when I am on her left side. Move to her right and she is jumpy and will shy away.
Fast movements of my arms or body gets her attention and makes her very nervous. I'm doing some desensitizing by waving my arms around until she settles down and begins to relax. Then I reward by loving on her.
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stablemind

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2016, 07:37:26 pm »

Quote
She seems to be more at ease when I am on her left side. Move to her right and she is jumpy and will shy away.

I think that may be typical with a sensitive horse that's used to the person leading them from the left side. Our Pete T was like that for a long time - okay as long as you were on the left side, but when you moved to the right, he would be nervous and even try to maneuver himself back to where he felt comfortable. There was no reason for it other than his own sensitivity and lack of confidence. Rose will just have to learn that nice things happen whichever side you're standing next to. :)
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KysaSD

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #17 on: August 28, 2016, 07:50:12 pm »

Not sure my vaccinating her on the left side was a help!  We just couldn't postpone it any longer. We have the highest rate of west Nile in the nation.  Right now every bird that carries west Nile is migranting over top of us.  Definitely a challenge, but 30 years and countless thousands of vaccines in cows and pigs and I am quick.  Of course we have to booster that in 3 weeks.
Miss Rose is also getting a double dose of MgO for 10 days, just in case a magnesium deficiency is part of the problem.
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Kysa, South Dakota, 2 Mountain Horses, and a Mini, yes, I am crazy!

Mamafourboys

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #18 on: August 29, 2016, 07:54:48 am »

Over the weekend Kysa, myself and my 17 and 11 year old sons helped me move Rose over to the pasture. We made a smaller pasture in the large one because she is still difficult to catch.
She is now next to my other baby Lila, a 15 month old Peruvian Paso. They seem to get along well. Which makes me very happy because they will be life long pasture buddies!
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KysaSD

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2016, 04:25:10 pm »

Rose is now in my winter fat pen...a much larger area, a real horse pen size.  She let me touch her twice today, and April reports even better success.
She has been on Mg for over a week now.  Not sure that is helping, but she needs it to balance a deficiency in my hay, even if she was not deficient before.
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Kysa, South Dakota, 2 Mountain Horses, and a Mini, yes, I am crazy!

ponymare

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #20 on: September 07, 2016, 09:00:17 pm »

I'm enjoying your journey with Rose!
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KysaSD

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #21 on: September 08, 2016, 06:18:51 am »

April works in my town, but actually lives in a smaller town 15 miles away.  She has a friend on the edge of town with a paddock and an older horse.  April hopes to move Rose there in a couple weeks, and then she can spend smaller chunks of time more often.  After all, April does have children and a household that also demand her time!  Depending the winter, rose may come back later so she can use my arena...or just trailer here on her days off work.  Whatever seems best. 

Rose is much much better, but still is startled by things like throwing hay over the fence.  I cut her no slack, she just needs lots of times of people doing whatever they do, and the outcome is good.  Saddle fitting before she leaves so April has tack that will work.
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Kysa, South Dakota, 2 Mountain Horses, and a Mini, yes, I am crazy!

KysaSD

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2016, 10:56:42 am »

I need to remind April to post updates here.

Rose is now in a 2.5 acre pasture with ninja pony and two full sized horses.  Both April and I have been able to catch her, as long as we approach quietly.  This is a HUGE improvement.  In another week, she will need a west Nile booster, that may make me an enemy!
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Kysa, South Dakota, 2 Mountain Horses, and a Mini, yes, I am crazy!

ponymare

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #23 on: September 15, 2016, 03:56:09 pm »

Sunny has always been easy to catch but Gabe will take off if he thinks something is up, besides being fed.  You have to approach him quietly and sort of at an angle to his shoulder. It used to be the Princess that would sometimes take off and lead the others astray. It's hard to do the chasing them until they get tired in a bigger enclosure. I think Gabe needs to go back to the round pen. He's had too much time off. ;)
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KysaSD

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #24 on: September 30, 2016, 07:48:42 am »

Rose is not working out here....and I would welcome a little discussion.  She is still skittery around people.  You can catch her, but she will go away to the farthest corner first.

But she has become very nasty aggressive to her pasturemates. 

Here is a time line.  She was kept in a round pen...well square but that size...with Lila the yearling Peruvian and Lola the mini in the pasture next to her.  She was then turned out with them for two days.  I did not observe any aggression.

Then April moved Rose and Lila to a neighbors pasture cry close to her house.  At first we tried to load both horses in my two horse, but Lila the baby would not load.  So we opted for the stock trailer.  April put Lila and Rose in a 12 by 12 stall for the time it took to change trailers.  And during that time, Rose kicked Lila and made a cut on her leg.  We just figured it was too small a place.

Lila and Rose were placed in a 1 acre paddock with another horse.  And Rose's aggression to the other horses escalated.  At first it was at feeding time, but it is now random and all the time.  Rose is returning to my place and will be alone, but with horses she can see across the fence, but not in with her.

Non of is make sense to me.  And Rose is still timid with people, it is other horses she wants to kill.

Barb has agreed to take her back.  She will either work with her, or have a good rescue near her work with Rose.  But this is all so weird.
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Kysa, South Dakota, 2 Mountain Horses, and a Mini, yes, I am crazy!

misstux

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #25 on: September 30, 2016, 08:34:18 am »

The first thing that pops into my head is fear agression.
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slamduncan

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #26 on: September 30, 2016, 08:37:34 am »

Heat cycle????  I am not a mare person as you all know.
I also keep my horses in single paddocks, but that's a show ring thing and I don't need them all marked up when heading out to a show.

Do the other horses make sure she knows she's alpha?  Or are they standing up to her?
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Judi and the Boys, Rhode Island

kckc

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #27 on: September 30, 2016, 08:49:02 am »

like a bully?  or are they arguing over herd position.   I have a mare that I do not think was horse socialized when she was young - thank god she's not a bully but she will not let an alpha tell her what to do and doesn't want the others to get too close to her so she has to stay in a paddock by herself.   If the mare is being a bully that may just be her pasture character or perhaps she was a stalled horse as she grew up.   

I wonder if an acre is just small enough that she feels like the others are always coming at her?   As far as the people fear, (isn't she a paso?)  I've met a lot of paso's in my search and with some of them were a bit more high strung so I bet that takes a looonng time to resolve and not knowing her history might make it much longer.   
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KysaSD

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #28 on: September 30, 2016, 10:24:46 am »

After I wrote this, I thought of ovarian cysts. One of the first symptoms is often aggression.  We will be moving Rose back to my place on Monday, and I will observe her.  I may try to get her to a vet and check for ovarian cysts.  She will need to be sedated and have an ultrasound of the area.  But this is a possibility.
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Kysa, South Dakota, 2 Mountain Horses, and a Mini, yes, I am crazy!

stablemind

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Re: The story of Rose
« Reply #29 on: September 30, 2016, 10:42:51 am »

This reminds me of 2 experiences I've had with my horses. First, Sonny. We bought Sonny as a yearling and eventually put him with the other geldings we had at the time. The old appy was the boss, but Sonny seemed to wish to dispute that. I would put Sonny into a stall for feeding and when I would open the door to let him out, he would often turn and come out backwards. I was new enough to horse behavior that I didn't immediately understand what was going on, but eventually figured out he was threatening to kick but didn't dare since he was the bottom horse of the 3. When he got older and was started under saddle, he would sense when he was around a dominant horse and look for an opportunity to challenge. In groups of horses, he would come unglued. Dee owned him by then and figured out that Sonny was very insecure in this situation with a need to challenge and figure out the pecking order. He outgrew all these behaviors when he got older and mentally mature, even though he's been in a number of herds at various boarding barns. Now he's an amazingly confident horse who's quite happy near the bottom of the pecking order wherever he is. But as a youngster, his insecurity drove him to be ridiculously aggressive and prone to challenge other horses.

And you know the story of Dixie aka the Ninja Pony. She came here looking for a fight and could only be safely turned out with our lead mare and caused me a whole lot of work maintaining separate herds. She would viciously attack every other horse, usually with nary a pinned ear or dirty look. It took a year, but she eventually became a friendly member of the herd. Incidentally, while she was aggressive with other horses, she was easily intimidated by humans, especially a man. I have always wondered why Dixie acted like that, whether she was completely unsocialized before we got her or if she was traumatized from leaving a life-long home. I never knew anything about her past.

If you think Rose has promise as a good riding horse, it will be worth keeping her in a separate but social situation. The lesson I learned from Dixie is to give it a year. She may need a pasture buddy who's dominant but fair to teach her the necessary lessons.

All that said, I agree that some Pasos have skittish temperaments and this may be as settled as she's ever going to be.
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