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Author Topic: Ringbone Previcox and supplements...update  (Read 941 times)

2gaits

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Ringbone Previcox and supplements...update
« on: February 19, 2016, 05:42:04 pm »

Well after the diagnosis of ringbone my vet recommended Previcox for pain management for my mare. We are going to see if it will keep her disable for now. I'm hoping for maybe another year with her which still just blows my mind as she is only 11 years old. So questions for those of you that have dealt with ringbone or have given Previcox....
Anyone use Previcox and have a horse go sound enough to handle normal riding? Normal trails for around 3 hours with some gaiting?
Also she is already on a skin and allergy supplement. I'm thinking of adding a soft tissue joint supplement to her pack. I use and like platinum performance. Anyone notice an improvement when feeding such a supplement?
I'm trying to give this mare a chance at a pain free useable life for at least a bit longer. We are giving her 7 to 10 days on meds and will see how she does with riding.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2016, 04:05:45 pm by 2gaits »
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PAWalker

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2016, 06:09:16 am »

Hi 2gaits, I still occasionally read this forum and want to say how sorry I am you are dealing with this.

Your thread has a lot of hits but no comments.  This is a critical issue, so I will share what I know.

While my farm vet thinks it is ok to keep my IR horse on Previcox for the rest of his life, I disagree so I only keep him on it as needed.

  My IR horse has a lot wrong with him that is not related to his insulin issues; fractured sacrum, torn tendons from a certified rehab farrier taking too much heel in one strike in 2012, he is now showing signs of osteoarthritis in his left front fetlock.

In your case, I don't think you have a choice, regarding permanent use of Previcox.  It is supposed to be able to be used long term.

1.  Your horse's body is under a lot of stress, if she doesn't already have gastric stomach ulcers, she probably will eventually,  so watch for signs.  Uncomfortable while being brushed in the flank area and the barrel could be a sign.  Not wanting to have the cinch tightened is another.

2.  Keep the number of a qualified chiropractor on hand.  When things hurt HERE, a horse will start to compensate, and pretty soon something is out THERE. 

Joker is now 20 and has worked his way up to chiro visits every 2-3 months.  It's my experience when they realize they feel better, they buck/kick/play until they put something out again, lol

3.  I have Joker on Pure MSM for the rest of his life.  If your horse doesn't have metabolic issues, you could try something stronger like equine Cosequin.  I use the dog version on the neighbors old Lab I took in and that stuff works miracles.

Keep in mind anything we give a horse orally is only 20% absorption into the system, at best.  My vet had me put Joker on Kinetic Conquer which is the strongest pure hylauronic acid without a prescription.

I found it at Allivet for $127 for 64 ounces and free shipping.  Believe me that is cheap.

http://www.allivet.com/p-5684-conquer-liquid.aspx

4.  Keep her on a low starch diet -  as if she were insulin resistant, so as to help reduce inflammation.

I don't feed ration balancers.  I feed Horse Tech's High Point grass vit/min supplement that is soy free, grain free, and no added iron. 

It DOES have lysine in it, a much-needed amino acid.

http://horsetech.com/high-point-grass

5.  dont feed BOSS.. It is high in Omega-6 which is known to exacerbate any type of inflammation.

5.1. You can feed her Omega-3 Horsehine, unless she is allergic to flax.

I mix everything with warm water in Standlees Timothy pellets or orchard grass pellets.

6.  It goes without saying to keep her hooves trimmed frequently.  My horses get trimmed every four weeks.

7.  I would use boots on her as the pain/shock of the hammer driving nails in her hooves is soon going to be more than she should have to tolerate.

Joker has not been ridable since that a** of a certified farrier crippled him in 2012.  I still keep him booted right after a trim.  I use Easy Cares new Clouds; they are an RX boot with pads.  Can't say enough about how well they work and how well they hold up.  I bought them in May 2015, and the pads are barely showing any wear but I wash everything after each wearing.

8.  Has the vet mentioned anything about the possibility of IRAP therapy?  I'm not sure it can be used for ringbone, maybe do some research.

9.  Most of what I mentioned that I use for Joker is not cheap up front but is reasonable, long term.  When it comes to serious issues like ringbone and what Joker lives with, there are two choices:

Watch the horse suffer or get rid of it.

Spend the money and do what's right for the horse, u til the horse tells you it can't do this anymore.

I have laid my two elder horses to rest between November 2014 and May 2015.  The vet said it was a miracle I got Duke as far as I did.  The office staff tell me I could buy an upper level dressage horse with money I spend on these guys but that is my choice.  They are not commodities, they are my lifelong buds.

Meaning, if you're going to keep the mare, be prepared to spend the money and keep her the right way until her time comes.  Try to find deals on the good stuff that works on her but, the bottom line is there are no money shortcuts toward her good and well-being.

Wishing you the very best with her:)
Judy



« Last Edit: February 20, 2016, 06:43:59 am by PAWalker »
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KysaSD

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2016, 07:19:14 am »

Thanks for all that, Judy.  I have used previcox, and it is a very good NSAID, but I have never had a situation like the one above. 
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Kysa, South Dakota, 2 Mountain Horses, a Curly Foxtrotter, a TWH and a Mini, yes, I am crazy!

2gaits

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2016, 09:34:34 am »

Judy thank you for all the information. It is appreciated. My husband's first response when he heard the diagnosis was put her down. In fact he called the vet and told him just that. Vet made him look at the xrays and told us to at least try previcox.  My husband was a farrier for many years and has seen this. He is adamant the horse not suffer and be in pain.

I have a feeling keeping her pain free and rideable probably won't happen. My horses are boarded so she doesn't have an option of just being turned out to pasture. If I want to ride, she needs to be able to handle that. I already spend a lot on this mare because of a fly allergy. Skin and allergy supplement, really good fly spray, leg bands etc adding another supplement isn't a problem if it helps.

I've been thinking maybe it is time to be done with horses. My husband isn't well and we have had a total loss of his income. He physically is pretty crippled up and I don't think he can ride anymore. Expense of boarding two horses has gone up. Maybe it is time to move on to something else.
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OldnOrnery

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2016, 09:50:55 am »

I'm so sorry to hear this news.

My vet routinely prescribes canine Previcox for arthritis in equines for the rest of their lives. I haven't given it for longer than a week. This is an off-label use of firocoxib because the equine FDA circular say 14 days only. 

The other thing I know is to get the right dose for a horse. The dog dose of Previcox is an overdose for a horse. Sounds counterintuitive, but it has to do with the way the drug is differently metabolized by different species. The tested dose for horses is 0.045 mg for each pound of the horse's weight, or 45 mg for a 1000 lb horse. The Previcox pills come in a 57 mg size, which is a little high. You need roughly ¾ of a pill for the equine dose.  So I suggest you talk to your vet about how to dose your horse based on her weight.

Horses scarf them right down, even tho they are bacon flavored.
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oncidium

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2016, 06:42:17 am »

Previcox is pricey.  I had a horse on it for an injury, and I only got one box, I remember it was quite pricy.  But it is FAR more superior than bute.  This pricing was in 2013.

O

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misstux

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2016, 08:24:39 am »

It is cheaper to use the dog version. That being said, your vet can get in a lot of trouble for that.
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OldnOrnery

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2016, 08:10:23 pm »

Previcox is pricey.

It's the equine version of firocoxib, Equioxx, that is so pricey. That is why vets prescribe the canine 57 mg Previcox at 30 tabs for $80, or $2.67 for each 57 mg. Equioxx is $5.19 for each 57 mg dose, about twice as expensive as the tabs.
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oncidium

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2016, 06:15:47 am »

But times that per pound for the dosage for a horse.  Then times that for how long for the life of the horse.  And times that if there has to be an increase in dosage, or supply runs out and you can't find it or simple supply and demand, or an increase in price.   

Some people only have certain budgets too.

O

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KysaSD

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2016, 06:22:28 am »

O, the dosage per pound for a horse is 100 times LESS than the dosage for a dog.  Apparently carnivores metabolis this drug differently than herbivores.  I found previcox to be a reasonable price for long term pain medication.
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Kysa, South Dakota, 2 Mountain Horses, a Curly Foxtrotter, a TWH and a Mini, yes, I am crazy!

2gaits

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2016, 05:52:17 pm »

Well I haven't received a bill yet from the vet but if I understood correctly precipice is about a dollar a day. It is also easy to feed. Changed her shoeing as well to see if it helps. I noticed riding yesterday briefly that she was much more comfortable with standing. Still just in shock that she has this issue. Just doesn't make sense based on her history and the way she was been used. Definitely fits the idea that it can happen to any of them.
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2gaits

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Re: Ringbone Previcox and supplements...update
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2016, 04:05:02 pm »

Well today was the first time out on the trail since starting the previcox and different shoeing. Lucy did well and really wanted to go. I guess showing days are really a thing of the past and probably long overnight camping riding trips. I am happy that she seems comfortable and can hopefully at least be my weekend trail horse. I will check tomorrow and see how she is feeling and moving.
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