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Author Topic: navicular  (Read 430 times)

2gaits

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navicular
« on: November 29, 2015, 10:43:57 am »

Anyone have any experience managing a horse with navicular disease? What is the outcome any of you have had keeping one as a riding horse?
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misstux

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Re: navicular
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2015, 02:39:27 pm »

It depends on how bad it is. If I had known then what I know now, I would have pulled Deuce's shoes and soaked his feet for thrush. James Rooney showed a long time ago that it was caused bt a toe first landing. If a horse is nerved the nerves often regenerate. Look at Pete Ramey's website. A lot of current treatment, ie putting a horse on wedge pads is harmful in the long run.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2015, 03:17:06 pm by misstux »
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kckc

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Re: navicular
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2015, 04:14:26 pm »

friend of mine had navicular and I think she had her nerved.  I'll see if she'll give me some details.  I did read somewhere that you should get  very current information and not to listen to what farriers did several years ago... but have no first hand knowledge on that.
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gallatingal

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Re: navicular
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2015, 01:59:44 pm »

A lot of those barefoot sites say don't do what the farrier would do and then go on to spell out what farriers do, which in reality is nothing like we were taught even "back in the old days".  Then again the barefoot cure works for some and not for others, and is not really all that different if you think about it. The idea is to speed up the break over and make it as easy as possible.
I would say not one thing works for all horses. You may have to do some experimenting.  It depends on the horse and the progression of the problem I have seen people keep them sound enough  for light riding for a few years with correct shoeing/trimming and meds.
My friend has been going through this with her horse. She has kept him sound enough for a couple of years, but has just retired him to occasional light riding.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2015, 02:16:12 pm by gallatingal »
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kckc

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Re: navicular
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2015, 02:58:54 pm »

yeah and I didn't even mean barefoot vs shod farriers, I should have clarified I meant that some years ago there were suggestions to pad, different shoes, different angles or something that apparently has now been decided is not the correct answer at all.   Myself, no real knowledge. 
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gallatingal

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Re: navicular
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2015, 06:01:09 pm »

Who needs knowledge?? George and I just make stuff up when we debate.  :o
And since I "retired" from horseshoeing over 20 years ago, I am for sure one of the old school farriers. Don't listen to me.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2015, 06:10:09 pm by gallatingal »
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Life is short, buy the pony!

kckc

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Re: navicular
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2015, 06:21:18 pm »

*snicker*  I used to make up things with my ex... funny!   I know, KNOW, he made up knowing all the makes, models of old vehicles we passed on the road but since I didn't know I sure couldn't argue with him ...  :-)   
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misstux

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Re: navicular
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2015, 08:34:32 am »

I kept Deuce going for 13 years after his initial diagnosis. That being said, we mostly walked when we trail rode after that because the adobe ground is like concrete. I also buted him before every ride (5x per week) whether it was arena or trail, gave him a joint supplement and changed farriers.
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gallatingal

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Re: navicular
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2015, 10:33:05 am »

It's funny because all of my horses are barefoot with back up boots now. I just don't like the way so many barefooters around here talk bad about Farriers and say they do things that  they don't unless they are completely uneducated. 
That being said. If you have already own this horse and are not having good luck with your current farrier, you might try a good barefoot trimmer. I am not sure they can all "cure" a navicular horse like they claim, but some horse may be more comfortable with a good wild horse model trim. If I had a navicular horse that was not comfortable barefoot I would probably go with Gene Overnicks Naturable balance shoes, and make sure whoever puts them on at least watches the video on how to do it.
How did you shoe Duece Misstux, since it kept him mostly going for 13  years?
If you don't already own this horse, don't buy it.
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Life is short, buy the pony!

misstux

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Re: navicular
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2015, 08:22:41 am »

The farrier that I switched to was very good at his job and Deuce's feet were always in perfect balance. He also had a rim pad. Other than that nothing special with his feet.
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2gaits

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Re: navicular
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2015, 10:06:57 am »

No I am not thinking of purchasing a horse with this problem. That isn't something I would consider doing. A horse I already own has some mild lameness but it seems to still be an abscess issue. Giving her a bit more time with a drawing substance packed in foot. If it doesn't get better we will be going to the vet for xrays.
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