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Author Topic: feet  (Read 458 times)

2gaits

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feet
« on: February 14, 2015, 04:17:38 pm »

My husband managed to trim my mare. He told me today he didn't like what he saw in her white line. He said it reminded him of a founder look like her feet have been really stressed at some point. I had to have her trimmed twice by someone else. Both farriers have good reputations etc but the first took too much hoof. I can't believe this. I've had this mare since she was three and she has always been sound with healthy feet. So frustrating.
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Missyclare

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Re: feet
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2015, 09:23:11 pm »

What did the white line look like? It should be creamy yellow and 1/8" wide all the way around. If its dark, its infected and possibly "trenched" from being eaten away by bacteria. If you do not have a burgeoning frog and there's a sulcis crack in existence, include it all in your thrush regime. If the white line is red, then its inflamed and protection is needed. It could be inflammation from the short trim. If the white line is more than 1/8" thick in some places around the hoof, then the hoof is being torqued on and trim needs to be balanced. If the white line is stretched all the way around and looks angry, then its metabolic. If so, there will also be disturbance lines marking each episode running horizontally around the hoof wall and will fan down towards the ground as they get to the side of the heel.
The thought of founder is found in a different area, but a pulling toe lends to it.  It's a 1" diameter halo around the apex of the frog. If you put a ruler across the hoof from 9 to 3 o'clock and measure down to the groove from there, you should get a 1/2" measurement. Should be 3/4's but anything less than a 1/2" and protection is needed again. If the hoof is oval, instead of round, a long toe will pull forward, thinning the sole and pulling down on P3's nose (the depth measurement with the ruler) The descending weight brings P3's nose down on the inside of this thin sole + the ground coming up on the same = double whammy, inflammation, bone changes and protection is very much needed! Bone changes in the hoof will not remediate, they are permanent. A long toe will make a horse stumble, but a thin sole will make them mince their steps. If its metabolic, the white line will look angry, stretched and lets P3 down again. If you look at the groove dept from apex to heels, know that it is mirroring how the bone is sitting in the hoof. If its shallow at the apex, deep at the back, then P3 is down on its nose. If the depth is shallow from front to back, then the whole bone has sunken. If the horse has foundered, well, it would be hard to even recognize what you're looking at any more and time to get on the phone to the vet. 
So hopefully these investigations will help you. Fight thrush, protect if needed  get confidence and comfort, then move and work that trim for development. When the hoof is assaulted with a too short trim, the hoof responds with increased growth. When you move and work that trim, you get correct growth and development, not continued pathological growth......as long as there are no metabolic troubles. So check the diet for starch, sugar, iron and make sure of trace minerals, biotin, flax, lysine, methionine, leucine etc. Support new growth.
The next time a new farrier comes in the barn, tell him, he can trim only if he obeys the sole.
Hope this helps.....
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2gaits

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Re: feet
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2015, 06:16:27 pm »

Thanks for all the info. It looks like it is from the short trim.
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