verify account

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Username: Password:
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down

Author Topic: Stable design for a windy snowy place  (Read 582 times)

OldnOrnery

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 566
Re: Stable design for a windy snowy place
« Reply #15 on: January 01, 2015, 10:10:05 pm »

Karen, the Rainhandler might be a solution in some climates with moderate or year round rainfall, but here - - with 13 inches of rain in December - - moving that much water 3 feet from the wall isn't enough help. That's 11,000+ gallons of water in a single month.  The downspouts for my rain gutters empty into tight lines (closed drainage lines) that empty into two sumps, one for each side of the barn.

We don't have snow.

For washing horses, I have 2 rubber mats over gravel right behind my hitching rail which runs parallel to the front of the barn. No need for concrete, as there's a drain in that corner, and the gravel slopes away from the barn toward the drain. The front wall of the barn encloses the horse behind, and the hitching rail is in front. I rarely use the hitching rail for bathing because my mares like warm water and ground tie willingly for baths.

I'm not sure I'd like moveable walls in a stall. Horses hurt themselves too easily. I'd worry they'd get caught up on whatever secures the walls. That why I like my sliding stall doors. Inside the stall, the wall is flat. I've never needed a tractor inside a stall or inside the barn.

I liked the concrete aisle, but it was hard on my joints. I priced sealed rubber mats and bit the bullet. The mats are sealed together and go from wall to wall. I  I love the mats but do regret the expense of the concrete aisle, only to cover it up with mats. Rubber mats have so uses around barns. I fit a 5 x 8 ft. mat under my pipe fencing at the corners of my barn, where I have hose bibs. I keep clean and dry, and the horses have a mat to eat on. I also inset half mats in the gravel outside the stall doors, where the horses wear down the run stepping in and out.

So my mistakes so far were: 1-paying for a concrete aisle, only to cover it up with sealed rubber mats; 2-not installing a large enough water heater first time around ; 3-nstalling an outside barn light on the front of my barn and not in the back; 4-not having an electrical outlet outside on the wall opposite the hitching post, so I can body clip outside the barn (easily fixable); 5-installing automatic waterers that turned out to be useless because the water gets hot in the summer months and freezes when we have that week long freeze every year; 6-not installing an outside utility sink against an outside wall for dirty wash jobs like blankets; 7-not extending the roof eaves far enough over the stall doors to shade the stalls from sun in summer and from rain in winter; 8- not making my gravel runs large enough at first - 24 x 20 is fine, 16 x 16 too confining; 9- installing a 5 ft man gate into my paddock near the barn and then getting a bigger tractor. When I am queen, all gates with be 10 or 12 feet wide.
Logged

Myaj

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 324
Re: Stable design for a windy snowy place
« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2015, 11:13:12 am »

I love the tip on overhead doors instead of sliding.  The sliding doors are a major pain, snow or no snow.. heavy wind bends them, they get rusty, etc.

Whatever you do, watch your drainage.  You may have to build up an area but you don't want rain/snow pooling up in the barn and flooding areas.  We have lots of snow here, and its never an issue with rain gutters, but then again, I've never seen snow here that would trap someone in a house for 4 days so....

Plan room for tools (wheelbarrows, etc), lots of hay storage, lots of lights and outlets.  I've worked in barns with dirt floors and concrete.. my preference is dirt with rubber mats on top.  Just plain dirt the horses dig holes when tied, it is always dusty, etc.  Concrete is easy to sweep and stays level, but is hard and if a horse slips or goes down, its going to hurt.
Logged

Ozhorse

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 206
Re: Stable design for a windy snowy place
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2015, 02:38:25 pm »


Please excuse my ignorance, but what is an overhead door…?
Logged

ClaudiaIN

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 774
    • CQ Equine Gifts.Facebook.com/
Re: Stable design for a windy snowy place
« Reply #18 on: January 07, 2015, 02:41:26 pm »

overhead door-- like a garage door
Logged
see my website @ www.CQEquine.com
 
And on Facebook.   Www.Facebook.com/CQEquine

Ozhorse

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 206
Re: Stable design for a windy snowy place
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2015, 02:53:08 pm »



Roll-a-door ? or are they solid and open inward and above the head ?
Logged

kckc

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4397
Re: Stable design for a windy snowy place
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2015, 04:08:16 pm »

they have some that roll up in to a ball above the header or they have the ones that roll up and overhead on tracks.   
Logged
NC

OldnOrnery

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 566
Re: Stable design for a windy snowy place
« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2015, 07:25:33 pm »

Garage doors usually run on two fixed tracks that that are hung from the ceiling. The door is constructed in four or five hinged sections. So they waste all the space above the tracks. They are less expensive than roll-up doors.
http://img.diytrade.com/cdimg/1300284/17394551/0/1290156584/1000N_Automatic_Overhead_Garage_Door_Operator.jpg

 Roll-up doors are more of a commercial application in the USA, are often heavier, and often cost more.
Roll-up doors http://norcaloverhead.com/portfolio-view/steel-warehouse-roll-up-doors/
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up