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Author Topic: Beet Pulp Strainer  (Read 1441 times)

NoRegrets

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2013, 09:09:26 am »

I thought the reason to rinse the pellets was to get the dirt out.  So this idea seemed like a good one to me.

I'd also like to add that it's just me, my husband and the internet trying to figure this whole thing out.  I'm fairly opinionated and I don't always like what one or other vet has told me.  An example might be keeping a horse on stall rest for two weeks when they have an abscess when I think they should be outside.  So finding a horse forum where other's can share what does or does not work for them is invaluable to me. 

Keep the ideas coming.  I may or may not use them.  And sometimes I'll just tuck away that little tidbit of knowledge and one day it's just the right answer for what I'm looking for.

Debbie
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Debbie

Myaj

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #16 on: November 30, 2013, 07:07:43 pm »

At one time I bought some beet pulp, but it had molasses in it and I wanted to rinse it off.  I got one of those big square strainers that fits over the sink, would spray it down with hot water right at the kitchen sink (using the hand sprayer) and let it drain.  Seemed to work really good that way.  Still have that strainer around somewhere.. never really had another use for it.
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Opal

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2014, 06:00:29 am »

I have strained it if I am adding it to just add it (as-in, need to get more forage into a horse with bad teeth, or one that is underweight).  But since I do so much long distance riding I usually leave the water on, the beet pulp is such a good vehicle to get that extra hydration.

I LOVE beet pulp, have fed it dry (although not usually).  It's a wonder food IMO!
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FancyPants

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2014, 09:50:51 am »

I agree, Opal!  Mine love it. 
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OldnOrnery

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #19 on: January 08, 2014, 06:07:57 pm »

Are we all talking about the same thing?! Makes me wonder.

Here's the lowdown on how to prepare beet pulp as horse feed. As an unprocessed agricultural by-product, it's commonly rinsed, soaked, drained and rinsed again before being fed to remove contaminants. The quality of the by-product varies a lot, even from the same producer. If you have non-IR horses, a source of nice clean beet pulp, no old horses with chewing problems, horses willing to eat it dry, no need to try to get extra water in your horses, and no feed-bolters, then good on ya. Feed it dry. For the rest of us…some set-up like the OP's strainer set-up is a real convenience.

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Beet Pulp Basics and How to Use Beet Pulp in Your Horse’s Ration from the Equine Cushings IR Yahoo Group website.

Beet Pulp
• Is the fiber remaining after the sugar is removed from sugar beets
• Averages 9.6% protein
• Is low sugar (average 10.1%) and starch (average 1.3%)
• Provides energy at approximately 1.2Mcal per pound (similar to alfalfa, slightly less than oats)
• Can replace up to 25% (or more) of the hay ration because of its high fiber content
• Can help “hard keepers” gain or maintain weight without adding excess sugar and starch
• Will hold 3 to 10 times it’s volume in water
• Can be soaked and fed in a consistency from barely "moist” for horses with chewing problems to "soupy” to help get in fluid

Beet Pulp is available
• Plain ‐ no molasses added. The only ingredient listed on the label will be "Beet Pulp". The sugar content of unmolassed Beet Pulp can range from 6% to 12% but is usually less than 10%.
• Molasses added. The label will list "Beet Pulp" and "Molasses". The sugar content of molasses Beet Pulp can run from around 12% to higher than 20%. Small amounts of molasses may be added for dust control without being listed on the ingredient tag.
• Beet Pulp "shreds" usually have no further processing after the sugar is removed; some shreds are chopped before being bagged. Size can vary from a rough “chop” to larger bark‐like flat pieces.
• Beet Pulp pellets are shreds that have been finely chopped and formed into pellets.
• SpeediBeet is a brand of micronized (extreme fine chop) beet pulp, which absorbs water very quickly. It is popular in the UK and is slowly becoming available in the US.

How Much to Feed
•A half pound (dry weight before soaking) of plain Beet Pulp makes a good low‐carbohydrate carrier for supplements. This would be in the range of a couple of handfuls of pellets or a little more than half of a 1lb coffee can of shreds. This is the amount often used to replace a higher sugar/starch “prepared feed”.
•Feeding a pound or two (dry weight) of Beet Pulp can help maintain weight and 3 to 4 pounds or more will safely help with weight gain without increasing starch levels (instead of using grain or bagged feeds).
•Because of its high fiber content, Beet Pulp can be used as 25‐40% of the ration for horses who have difficulty chewing. If replacing hay with beet pulp, figure around 1lb of beet pulp (dry weight before soaking) for each 1½ to 2 lbs of grass hay (2 lbs of beet pulp would replace 3 to 4 lbs of hay).

Soaking Beet Pulp
•Beet Pulp shreds can be fed without soaking ‐ this has long been a practice at racetracks. Dry shreds are no more likely to cause choke than any other dry feed; however most horses (and their humans) prefer them soaked, or at least moistened.
•Some shreds will soak up in as little as ten minutes in warm water; twenty to thirty minutes is usually adequate.
•Beet Pulp pellets tend to be much harder than other pellets and they should be fully soaked. The pellets will soften up in an hour or two depending on the brand and temperature and will expand up to 10 times their original volume in 2‐4 hours. It's really difficult to describe if you've never seen it.
•Caution ‐ many report beet pulp gettng "sour" if left too long, especially in warm weather or if left in the sun during soaking. You can start soaking pellets in the morning for an evening feed (or in the evening for a morning feed), preferably in the shade.
•Use a lot of water for soaking. There should be an inch or two or water remaining on top after the beet pulp is done soaking – this will be drained off before feeding. It can take a little experimenting to see how much water you will need.
•Rinsing before soaking will help remove dust and surface iron. Draining in a colander and rinsing until the water runs clear after soaking will help remove residual molasses – this is effective if you are unable to get plain (no molasses added) beet pulp.
•You can add fresh water back in if you want to feed a “soupier” version or if you horse needs more fluids.
•You can then add supplements, salt and other "stuff" either top dressed or stirred in.
•Some horses will initially turn up their nose at beet pulp and will take some acclimating. It can help to start with just a little beet pulp added to something they already like, then gradually increase the beet pulp while decreasing the other feed to make the transition. Many horses will just dive right in but if your horse needs a taste tempter, Megan’s website page on Natural Flavorings can give you some good ideas.
•Feeding beet pulp in flat feed pans or a small bucket rather than wall feeders simplifies clean up ‐ you can take the pans to a hose to rinse them out. Low sides of a feed pan are also less apt to “concentrate” the new smells than a bucket or straight sided feeder – this lets the horse use his natural curiosity to explore his new feed without being overwhelmed by the strange smell and taste.

Tips for Boarders
Boarding your horse always makes controlling your horse’s diet harder but many have found ways to work beet pulp into the routine.
• If you can get to the barn daily, soak the beet pulp at home or at work (a small cooler can work well for soaking and transporKng). You can do this once a week or so and keep it in baggies in your freezer, ready for a quick grab on your way out the door.
• If the barn has a refrigerator, you can soak/drain/rinse the beet pulp at home and pack in individual baggies to keep in the barn’s fridge. (For more than 3‐4 days, it should be kept in the freezer.)
• While “soak/drain/rinse” is ideal to remove surface iron, dust and residual sugar, the draining/ rinsing could be skipped if your beet pulp is unmolassed and relatively dust free.
• If the barn owner is willing to help, make it easy for them. Pre‐measure the beet pulp and your supplements into baggies, provide a large closed bucket or other container to keep your stuff neat and together. If needed, provide the bucket for soaking, a colander for draining, a metal sweat scraper for stirring. And be willing to offer paying a bit extra for this service.

Beet pulp is not “necessary” but is a low sugar/low starch alternative to bagged feeds and grain or can be used as a substitute for some of the hay ration (especially if you need to replace some high sugar/starch hay) and is well accepted by most horses. It doesn’t take long to get into a routine and the benefits usually outweigh any inconvenience.

© 2007‐2010 Desert Equine Balance Pac Woodbury‐Kuvik DesertEquineBalance@gmail.com
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FancyPants

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #20 on: January 08, 2014, 07:24:15 pm »

Interesting - but I have to tell you that I have NEVER rinsed/soaked/rinsed/drained in the 15?? years I've been using beet pulp pellets in combination with added loose salt, vit/min pellet and roughage cubes.  Soupy?  they slurp and lick the dishes clean.  Then they run around like fools making sure everybody else's dish is cleaned up, and add a couple more licks to it.  3 c of pellets hydrated overnight (as in 24 hrs) gets fed every evening - to a range of ages.  All get fed from dishes on the ground - the younger ones "protected" from the older mares.  Everybody vets well and the ONLY time I've had a vet in a long time , for other than shots and herd help check-ups (touch wood) is for a reaction to a vaccine and it was her refusal to eat that caught my eye.  All are in great shape and ready to work - even the mini.   

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OldnOrnery

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2014, 11:59:18 am »

I'm not surprised. If you don't have horses with the listed issues, why rinse? Horses adapt to eating all kinds of things and learn to love what they're used to.

Here's the experiment. Try rinsing a cup of BP off. Then cover it in hot water for 15 or 20 minutes. What color is the water you drain off? If it's clear, your forage is unusually clean and unusually low in sugar, and I'm jealous.  ;D

P.S. You can do this same experiment with your hay. There is a real difference in the rinsed forage. It has less surface dirt and about 30% less sugar than unrinsed. 

Here, BP is grown in fine adobe clay soils. That's what's rinsed off. The sugar difference is irrelevant to a working horse and to a non-IR horse.  My older mare is IR  and her insulin is higher than ideal because she cannot exercise due to a suspensory tear.  So I work to keep sugar and iron out of her diet.
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FancyPants

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #22 on: January 09, 2014, 09:41:16 pm »

I'll try and do this tomorrow evening....and fwiw, my 23 yo mare was diagnosed with thyroid issues some 12 yrs ago - same synthetic meds and I take but I could not afford them.  She gets treated the same as the others in terms of worming and feed and she's still my go-to for ponying the colts or working cows.  She's always had odd conformation issues (bum high, chronic, intermittent lameness, interesting abscesses - ALWAYS sound whenever we head for home  lolol).  Right now she's still herd boss, and no more fat than she needs to be for this time of year.  She can still get up and go and buck & rear like a fool, run like crazy, make me work for my ride - but work like any good horse.  She lets the kids ride her and my 87 yr neighbour got on her back.  Her feet are in great shape thanks to changing farriers.  From all I read on here about IR, thyroid, etc. she should be taken away from me because of neglect....but honestly - she makes me laugh every day with her antics and I'd still trust her with my life.  Some days I think we think too much.
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NoRegrets

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2014, 04:41:01 am »

When I was buying the beet pulp shreds, there would be a lot of left over water after soaking and the whole thing was a brown soup.  And using a strainer is a good idea.  But I am now using the pellets, and there is no leftover water.  Once I soak them, it's just a soft cloud of pulp.  There is nothing to rinse off.  It becomes a dry mixture with no liquid.  I even tried rinsing them before I soaked, and there was nothing but clear water.   So if I were worried about the sugar, I guess I would have to go back to the shreds in order to soak out the sugar.  Unless I'm doing something wrong with the pellets, I don't see how to rinse them.  Fortunately, I'm not dealing with IR, so I'll keep using the pellets.
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Debbie

OldnOrnery

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2014, 08:24:18 pm »

"Some days I think we think too much."

Guilty.  :-X
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Mtn Horse

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Re: Beet Pulp Strainer
« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2014, 06:57:00 pm »

I've fed soaked beet pulp for over 10 years to all our horses. I like it wet as I think they can always use the extra water summer or winter. I also feed some before trail rides in the summer to keep them hydrated. Learned about that from CTR folks.
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